Standard work, custom twist

November 1, 2013

By Sigrid Tornquist One of the reasons Darren Arthur is good at the marine fabrication business is that he understands the boating community and the user impact of poorly designed or fabricated—or simply worn-out—elements. And that’s often the moment when clients seek out Arthur’s help. The owners of “Sweetie Pie”—a 2003 cruiser—contacted Nautilux in 2012 …

The great(er) outdoors, all year

When the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), needed to enclose a very large courtyard to be able to use the space all year long, they turned to J. Miller Canvas Inc. of Santa Ana, Calif., to make it happen. The solution: a motorized, sliding panel roof system, engineered to be covered or retracted to …

Weaving vignettes of memory

Early Jacquard looms used punch cards to automate weaving of patterns and designs. This punch card technology also was used to program early computers and store binary code. Phillip Stearns, a New York-based artist exploring the intersection of digital media and textile design, developed a project that combined the two histories to provide a visual …

Bottom line: evaluating comfort

Recall your last marathon all-day, all-night drive—and the aftermath. Remember the aching back and neck, headache, sweating torso and ice-cold feet, the feeling of other-worldliness? The symptoms of uncomfortable vehicle seats include decreased concentration and tiredness that can lead to accidents. The Hohenstein Institute, Bönnigheim, Germany, has developed test methods for assessing the physiological comfort …

Over-the-top remake for historic train station

The Salzburg, Austria, Central Train Station is a major transportation hub, connecting nearly 15,000 people to surrounding towns and bringing tourists to admire the breathtaking mountain views. The original station, built in 1908, consisted of a building with an arched marble hall and an arched two-part metal hangar on an island platform. Renovation plans in …

Threading compassion through end-of-life tapestries

Aging and death conjure images grey and grim, steeped in sadness. Vermont artist Deidre Scherer brings color, texture and dignity to her life-sized thread-on-fabric depictions of end-stage illness, on exhibit Sept. 23 through Nov. 18 at the United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities, New Brighton, Minn. “Her work reminds the viewer that knowing we …